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Ayurvedic Methods to Help You Sleep

By on Oct 19, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Having a hard time falling asleep or staying asleep throughout the night?  Do you feel like you have tried everything and are still coming up short? If you answered ‘yes’ to one or both of those questions, then we might have a solution: ayurvedic remedies!  Sleep is extremely important for the body so if you are lacking sleep you should try one of the suggestions in the article below. Sleep Deprivation? Here’s How Ayurveda May Help You Sleep Better Those who suffer from insomnia can turn to Ayurveda to treat the problem and get proper sleep. The significance of a good night’s sleep should not be discounted. Sleep is important for the body to recover and get ready for the following day. It is also the only time when the brain is given some time off to take proper rest. Experts suggest that our sleep cycle is divided into many stages and for a person to go through all these stages is extremely important. On an average, every person should get at least 8 hours of sleep in a day, contrary to which researches report most people barely touch the recommended hours of sleep every night. Most people are getting only close to 6 hours of sleep in a day. As the daily number of sleeping hours fall consistently for people across the globe, the increasing incident of obesity and growing levels of stress are making most of us fall prey to a range of lifestyle diseases. Prolonged sleep deprivation has been linked to an increased risk of loss of memory, neurological ailments and cognitive decline. Those who suffer from insomnia can turn to Ayurveda to treat the problem and get proper sleep. Ayurveda expert Vasant Lad describes insomnia as an outcome of an increase in Vatadosha in the mind or the nervous system. Some of the ways your diet can help you battle insomnia and sleep better are listed below: – Try warm milk just before turning in. Add a pinch of nutmeg, some cardamom and crushed almonds. – “Try garlic milk. Mix together 1 cup of milk, 1/4 cup water, and 1 clove of fresh, chopped garlic. Boil until 1 cup liquid remains. Consume. – Regular consumption of cherries has also been linked to inducing good sleep. – You can also try consuming a cup of fresh tomato juice with 2 teaspoons of sugar and a pinch of nutmeg. Consume this around 4-5pm in the noon and have an early dinner. Tips and remedies are sourced from Vasant Lad’s The Complete Book of Ayurveda Remedies....

Are You Drinking Your Water the Ayurvedic Way?

By on Apr 25, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Water is crucial to the body’s functioning and homeostasis. There are different opinions out there on how much water you are supposed to drink everyday. Did you know, however, that there are ayurvedic suggestions on how and when to consume water? Learn what they are in the article below and try practicing them yourself. The Correct Way Of Drinking Water Human body consists of 50-70% water. Our body continuously needs water to perform all the activities and functions; therefore drinking water is very good for health. Ayurveda has laid down some essential guidelines for drinking water to help improve your health and to prevent any ailments due to the improper water drinking habits. [Read:What Detox Ingredients To Add To Your Drinking Water?] Ayurveda: The Right Way To Drink Water 1. It is better to drink water while sitting than while standing. 2. You should drink it slowly and avoid gulping down large volumes of water in a single breath. 3. Tepid water is best to drink and it is advised to avoid drinking ice cold water. 4. It is best to drink when you are feeling thirsty. When you listen to thirst cues and sip water throughout the day you’ll be drinking the right amount. 5. You should stop drinking water after you feel satiated as it is a signal from your body to stop drinking. 6. The color of your urine may indicate whether you are sufficiently hydrated or not. The color of your urine should be fairly clear and straw colored. Dark yellow urine may indicate a sign of dehydration. 7. Dry chapped lips may also indicate the lack of sufficient water being supplied to your body. 8. Normally the minimum gap between food and water should be between 1.5 to 2.5 hrs. Though it may vary according to different geographic locations, as the body’s ability to digest food depends on external factors like the outside temperature. 9. Though very contradictory, but the right time to drink water while taking food is to drink just the required amount of water, along with your food rather than drinking water before or after food. 10. If really thirsty, one can have fresh fruit juice after morning meal, buttermilk after lunchand milk after dinner. Though these also contain mostly water, the properties are completely different and are good for our digestive system. 11. Ushapan is a famous Ayurvedic practice of drinking water in the morning.  A regular ushapaan helps in keeping the body healthy. It also helps to get rid of many diseases and disorders like headaches, blood pressure, anemia, obesity, arthritis etc. Why Shouldn’t You Drink Water After Meal According To Ayurveda? Ayurveda strictly prohibits drinking water at the end of a meal as it kills the energy required by our digestive system to process the ingested food. This allows the food to remain in our system for longer duration which may cause the food to rot inside our system, instead of getting digested, which may lead to the formation of gas and acidity problems. Source:...

Ayurveda and Yoga

By on Mar 17, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Practicing Ayurveda and yoga together is very beneficial because it encourages more wellness and natural healing than done just one thing alone. Now that it feels like spring, why not try to incorporate the one you have not been practicing to the one you have already tried? If you follow the Ayurveda healing system, try doing more yoga with the poses before to feel great this spring. The key to true mind-body balance? Understanding your body’s natural needs—how to eat, cook, cleanse, and heal—through each season. In our new online course Ayurveda 101, Larissa Hall Carlson, former dean of Kripalu’s School of Ayurveda, and John Douillard, founder of LifeSpa.com and best-selling author, demystify yoga’s elemental sister science. Sign up now! Spring cleaning isn’t just for your closets—your yoga practice needs a refresh, too, says Larissa Hall Carlson, co-leader of Yoga Journal’s new online course, Ayurveda 101. “In the cool, rainy days of early spring, it’s important to light some fire and melt away congestion from excess kapha dosha with fiery, stimulating yoga postures,” she explains. Here are three poses Carlson suggests incorporating into your regular practice or favorite sequence this spring. Warm up with 3–5 rounds of your favorite Sun Salutation, and use a robust Ujjayi pranayama throughout to ensure physical warmth and enhanced mental focus. 1. Dolphin Pose The inversion of Dolphin Pose is excellent for draining mucus created by excess kapha dosha from the lungs, Carlson says. It’s also great for building strength in the arms while opening up the ribcage. Hold for 6–10 long, deep breaths. Learn how to do Dolphin Pose. 2. Side Plank (Vasisthasana) Side Plank ignites arm power while building core strength. Springtime is a good time to stoke the fire in the core, because it often gets dull during the transition from cold winter to rainy spring. Side Plank also helps boost the fire of metabolism, which helps reduce puffiness and water retention (common signs of excess kapha dosha). Sustain the pose for 10 long, deep breaths. Learn how to do Side Plank. 3. Revolved Chair Pose (Parivrtta Utkatasana) Revolved Chair Pose works this lovely twist to wring out clutter and congestion in the abdominal region, while opening the chest (the lungs and the stomach are the seats of kapha and often feel bogged down during early spring). Go back and forth side to side three times per side, holding for three long, deep breaths on each side, like you’re wringing out a sponge. Deepen your breath and enjoy the purifying heart! Learn how to do Revolved Chair Pose. Source:...

The Advantages of Ancient Traditional Medical Systems

By on Feb 14, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Prevention and treatment of all related diseases were well-known to our sages in the Vedic era. Today modern medical science works mainly in these areas: Primary prevention Secondary prevention Control Cure Acute management Rehabilitation Palliation   If we go through a comparative analysis of the above-mentioned factors we come to the conclusion that ancient traditional medical systems (Ayurveda and natural medicine) have several advantages:   Primary prevention: The main goal is to prevent diseases. For this purpose immunization is used in modern medicine. Starting from childhood until a certain age, vaccinations and similar precautions have been adopted but these are useful to a limited extent. There are specific vaccinations for diseases like polio, measles, hepatitis and so on, but in some cases polio and measles occur even after the vaccination. As has been mentioned earlier, Ayurveda, yoga and natural medicine are not only a medicine system but are the best and most scientifically examined system of living life in harmony with nature. One who practices yoga regularly and takes Indian gooseberry (amvala), Tinospora (guducT), Holy basil (tulasT), Aloe vera and a group of vitality promoting herbs, Astavarga along with a natural lifestyle can stay free from disease almost entirely. This is a big achievement and eventually the whole universe will have to revert to this path. By following yoga, natural medicine and an Ayurvedic lifestyle, all the cells of the body and also the complete body remains balanced and controlled which promotes longevity; by means of meditation and self-control, one moves on the path of salvation as has been said by the great sages of India. By following yoga, Ayurveda and natural medicine we prevent the degeneration c” cells, tissues, internal organs and the complete body system and also provide strength, detoxification and equilibrium to the receptors of every cell from genes and chromosomes to life itself, in a natural way. In this way we protect the body from degenerative lifestyle diseases and also make the body youthful, energetic, healthy and productive. It is the science that keeps away disease, aging and death.   The primary aim of Ayurveda is to safeguard the health of a person, emphasizing the approach of healthy living by adapting a lifestyle and diet according to the seasons and following a disciplined daily regimen. When it comes to hereditary disorders we have successfully treated those who have suffered from birth from hypertension or bronchial asthma and have also protected people at risk of genetic abnormalities. In view of medical science, this is our great experience and achievement and it can be a great boon for the world. If there is any system that can achieve primary prevention of diseases close to hundred percent, it is only Ayurveda. Yoga and natural medicine are parts of Ayurvedic treatment system.   Secondary prevention: The main aim of secondary prevention is that if a person had a history of myocardial infarction, hemorrhagic stroke or status asthmaticus and such conditions, medicines should be given which do not let the disease recur and also to complete this goal Ayurveda is more effective. As in the case of myocardial infarction, there are seven main causes including hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity, tobacco and use of narcotics, lack of physical activity and hereditary causes.To some extent these causes can be controlled by modern medicine but Ayurvedic treatment has long term success and is effective permanently. Control: In this context, modern medicine is more effective than Ayurveda under certain conditions such as bacterial, viral and other infections. However, high cholesterol level, hypertension, diabetes and other such disorders can be controlled in both ways. Cure: The number of diseases that can be completely cured by modern medicine are very few like chronic infections such as tuberculosis, injuries and those needing surgical intervention. Ayurveda can completely cure diseases from dengue, hepatitis, colitis, pancreatitis, chronic bronchitis, arthritis, psoriasis and migraine to cancer and many other diseases. In the complete cure of disease Ayurveda plays an important role. Acute management: In myocardial infarction, hemorrhagic strokes or in case of any accident, traumatic and surgical condition, modern treatment method is more effective. Ayurveda needs to focus more on research in this field. 6-7. Rehabilitation and Palliation: In rehabilitation and palliation, both of these treatment methods are very effective. Ayurvedic treatment is one thousand years old, easy, simple, authentic, safe and a scientific heritage of Indian saints. We can preserve our culture by making use of Ayurvedic treatment. By adopting Ayurveda in life one can achieve an easy, healthy, and natural life and also benefit from the ancient, rich cultural philosophy and ideology. This content is original and written for Optimal Wellness Arizona.  For more information contact Sharmane Solomon of Optimal Wellness...

Why You Should Add Holy Basil To Your Diet

By on Jan 25, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The list of benefits found in ‘holy basil’ seem to be endless according to this article. This herb not only bring anti-aging, detoxifying and immunizing properties, but it is also used in Ayurveda! The article below dives into all of the benefits you feel if you consume holy basil. Read more to understand the benefits! (Natural News) Holy basil, also known as tulsi, Ocimum sanctum or Ocimum tenuiflorum, is a sacred plant to many Hindus, and is used in a wide variety of religious contexts. It is also an important herb in Ayurveda, or traditional Indian medicine. Although the plant has been used in Ayurveda for centuries, Western herbalists and scientists are only just beginning to understand the powerful benefits of this anti-aging, detoxifying herb. In Ayurveda, holy basil is used to support immunity, aid detoxification, modulate stress and slow aging. In Western herbalism, the plant is known as an “adaptogen,” or a plant that increases the body’s resistance to a wide variety of environmental stressors, rather than having only a few specific effects (such as lowering blood pressure, for example). Adaptogens are so named because they adapt their function to the needs of the body, thus helping maintain balance. (Learn more about natural medicine for preventing disease at Prevention.news) Soothing stress, slowing aging According to Ayurveda, holy basil can be used to boost mood, stamina and endurance by filling the body with a calming energy. It can help speed up slowed digestion or free up suppressed emotions. Studies suggest that some of holy basil’s benefits come from its ability to help the body regulate its levels of cortisol, which is sometimes called the “stress hormone.” Released during times of stress, cortisol activates many components of the sympathetic nervous system, also known as the “fight or flight” response. While this response is important in times of crisis, it is hard on the body over time, and cortisol has been linked to many of the negative health effects of chronic stress. Holy basil’s effects on cortisol may partially explain its traditional use in Ayurveda to soothe emotional and digestive upset. Cortisol can also suppress the immune system, a condition holy basil is also used to treat. The herb’s much-lauded anti-aging effects may come in part from its high antioxidant activity. Researchers believe that many of the effects of aging come from cell and DNA damage caused by chemicals known as free radicals; antioxidants help remove free radicals from the body. Science beginning to explore effects Holy basil’s antioxidant effects likely make it a powerful cancer preventive, as cancer is one of the many health conditions linked to free radical damage. A 2007 study from the Journal of Medicinal Food further suggests that holy basil may also exhibit direct anticancer activity. In that study, cancer was induced in rats, who were then treated with varying doses of holy basil leaf extract. At concentrations of 300 mg per kg of body weight, the extract reduced cancer cell formation, oxidative damage to proteins and fats, and levels of enzymes responsible for producing further toxic effects in the body. Another study, published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology in 2008, found that holy basil might help reduce the effects of nerve degeneration (neuropathy), a common side effect of injury and many diseases, such as diabetes. Researchers severed sciatic nerves in the paws of rats, then treated them with holy basil extract for ten days. They found that over the course of the treatment, the nerve degeneration was reduced, and nerve sensitivity and motor control increased. Rats treated with holy basil extract also showed decreased oxidative stress and higher levels of calcium and glutathione. (RELATED: Learn about more natural remedies at Remedies.news) Holy basil may also be good for the skin, perhaps due to potent antimicrobial activity. A study published in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science in 2006 compared the effects of holy basil, sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum, the type commonly used in Western cooking), and hoary basil (Ocimum americanum) on bacteria believed to be the cause of acne. The researchers found that both holy basil and sweet basil showed significant antimicrobial effects. Sources: YogaJournal.com NaturalNews.com § (Natural News) One in five U.S. adults suffer from arthritis, a term used to describe inflammation of the joints. Arthritis, which can be caused by a variety of widely differing health conditions, is the number one cause of disability in the United States. Because there is no cure for arthritis, the condition is typically treated with over-the-counter or prescription painkillers and anti-inflammatories (underlying health conditions, such as autoimmune disorders, may have their own treatments). But as with all pharmaceuticals, these drugs can carry side effects or even serious risks, particularly if used long term. But, there is a natural alternative. If you suffer from stiff, inflamed or painful joints, try the following essential oil treatments, and see if they are able to offer you relief. (Also, stay informed about natural remedies at Remedies.news) Which oils to use Many essential oils have overlapping effects, so you can either choose the oil that you best like the smell of (or that is least expensive or easiest to find), or you can combine multiple oils to boost their effectiveness, or both. Eucalyptus oil is a natural topical analgesic, which is why it is included as an ingredient in many medicated chest and muscle rubs. Part of its painkilling power may come from its...

Ayurveda in the New Year.

By on Dec 29, 2016 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Is your resolution in the new year going to be to practice ayurveda more? If so, you can use this article as your starting guide! It explains and teaches a different meditation for each of the three doshas. Meditation itself has many benefits so if you tie that into ayurveda you will be even better off! Learn about the meditations in the article below. The key to true mind-body balance? Understanding your body’s natural needs—how to eat, cook, cleanse, and heal—through each season. In our upcoming online course Ayurveda 101, Larissa Hall Carlson, former dean of Kripalu’s School of Ayurveda, and John Douillard, founder of LifeSpa.com and best-selling author, demystify yoga’s elemental sister science. Sign up now! The new year is the perfect time for a fresh start—and meditation can help, no matter what your dosha is, says Larissa Hall Carlson, former dean of Kripalu’s School of Ayurveda and co-leader of Yoga Journal’s new course, Ayurveda 101. “Meditation is important for all the doshas, all year long, but it’s especially important this time of year as we re-focus goals and set intentions,” she says. While the following three meditations can be done by anyone at any time of year, each one is intended to balance the qualities of each dosha, whether you’re looking to balance your personal constitution or the qualities of the current season. Here, Carlson shares her favorite New Year’s meditation for each dosha. Vata: Japa Meditation Establishing rhythm is one of the most effective ways to stabilize an overactive or scattered mind. When the light, subtle, and mobile qualities of vata dosha increase excessively during the cold and windy winter season, excess vata often manifests as mental restlessness, stress, fear, or anxiety. Luckily, the rhythmic repetition of mantra during japa meditation slows down a racing mind and enhances focus. I like using mala beads to track the mantra repetitions, as mala beads have some weight, and that tangible anchor is good for grounding excess vata and staying on point. Don’t have mala beads? Not to worry–just repeat the mantra for several minutes, until you feel quiet and relaxed. How to Practice Japa Meditation First, choose a mantra that resonates with you. The following mantra to settle the mind is especially popular for yogis in the new year: Yogash Chitta Vritti Nirodhah (Yoga ceases the fluctuations of the mind). Grab your favorite set of mala beads and sit down comfortably. Cover up with a warm blanket. Take the mala into the right hand, draping it over the middle, ring, and pinky fingers (relax the pointer finger—it doesn’t touch the mala). Use the thumb to move the mala beads, one bead at a time. Close your eyes. Repeat the mantra once for each bead, using a soothing rhythm. Do this 108 times, or until the mind gets focused and steady. Kapha: Walking Meditation Ensuring good movement and circulation is important for preventing the heavy, thick, wet qualities of kapha dosha from accumulating during the rainy spring kapha season (or if you’ve been eating too many holiday treats this winter!) and manifesting as mental sluggishness, lethargy, foggy thinking, and lack of motivation. You can reduce excess kapha by using meditation techniques that have sharpness, lightness, and mobility. One of my favorite meditations for kapha is walking mediation, as it keeps the body moving while enhancing focus and mental clarity. Clear out the cobwebs and get moving this new year! How to Practice Walking Meditation Carve out 15–20 minutes. If it’s cold outside, look for a quiet place to do an indoor walking meditation, like a long hallway, a library, a yoga studio before class, or even circling laps through any room in your home. Take off your shoes and socks, if possible. Stand in Mountain Pose and take a few breaths, to notice how you’re feeling and set your intention for the practice (perhaps around taking new steps in your life in the new year). With natural breath and a downward gaze, start walking slowly and rhythmically, either back and forth in a long line or repeating a circular path. As you walk, begin using these three phrases: “lift, move, place.” Anchor your mind’s attention on the sole of each foot as you travel, noting the sensation as the foot “lifts” off the floor, “moves” through space, and is “placed” back on the floor. Pitta: Meditation on the Breath Peace and quiet—that’s what you need when the hot, sharp qualities of pitta increase excessively in the mind during the hot, humid summer season (or from work stress or chaotic holiday to-do lists). When excess pitta manifests as mental irritation, frustration, impatience, or anger, then a cooling, refreshing, quieting, spacious meditation technique is in order. Meditation on the breath redirects the sharp focus of pitta to rest on the refreshingly quiet and subtle anchor of the breath. Letting go of typical planning, organizing, and list-making activities that often consume pitta’s attention and making time for true quiet can reset the mind into a tranquil state, allowing you to calmly tackle the new year. How to Meditate on the Breath Find a comfortable seat where you won’t be interrupted or distracted. Sit up tall with your hands on your lap and your palms turned up. Close your eyes. Soften the muscles in your face and jaw. Anchor your mind’s attention on the belly. Without controlling the breath, simply observe the natural movement and sensation of breath at the belly....